Author: Kyung Kim

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

We are celebrating Asian and Pacific American Heritage this month. Congress proclaimed a week of May in 1979 as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week, and in 1992, it designated May as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. The month of May was chosen to commemorate the first Japanese immigrants coming to the United States on May 7, 1843, and the Golden Spike Day of May 10, 1869 when Chinese workers contributed tremendously to complete the first transcontinental railroad in the United States.

Over one hundred years have passed since Angel Island, a counterpoint to Ellis Island, was built on the West Coast. It was used as an immigration detention center during the Asian exclusion era. Today, the estimated number of AAPI population in the U.S. is 24.2 million, and according to the U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimate, Asian Americans are one of the fastest-growing racial or ethnic groups in the U.S. Over the years, AAPIs have contributed to shaping the identity of the nation. They have confronted persistent exclusion and inequity in domestic policies and social practices, and yet contributed to the nation’s economy, science and technology, and culture and arts. They fought not only against discrimination and violence in the nation, but also in many wars to protect the nation. Yet, their challenges and struggles, and contributions to and legacies in U.S. history and culture have not been well-recognized or educated. It was only last month when the very first bill mandating a curriculum of Asian American History in public schools passed. 

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APA Style Guide: What’s New in the 7th edition?

Fall is finally here on the main campus of FSU, and so is the 7th edition of the APA Style Publication Manual! The APA style is one of the most common styles for formatting citations and references, and more than 100 academic disciplines are reportedly using the style for their writing and publishing scholarly works. The APA 7th features two new chapters: Journal article reporting standards (Chapter 3), and bias-free language guidelines (Chapter 5), respectively. It also includes a sample paper for students, with over 100 simplified in-text citations and new reference examples.

A few notable changes in the APA 7th include:

·         One space after a period

·         No location required for book and book chapter references

·         Use of singular “they”

·         Three or more authors shortened to name of first author plus “et al.”

·         DOIs and URLs are now presented as underlined hyperlinks.


For more detail on the changes, watch the recording of webinar, “What’s New in APA Style: Inside the Seventh Edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association” from the ACRL Choice.  The APA Style Blog is the best source to get information on the APA 7th. The Blog also provides links to handouts and guides for instructors, such as Reference Quick Guide, and Student Title Page Guide.  In the meantime, contents on the 6th edition APA Style Blog are archived in here.

Six print copies of the APA 7th edition are available at the following locations of the University Libraries:

·         3 Copies at Strozier Course Reserves

·         3 Copies at Dirac Course Reserves

The copies are now available for in-library use only for 2 hours. Unfortunately, eBook copies of the APA 7th are not available for the Libraries.  The Libraries’ Citation Guide to APA will be updated accordingly, and published before Spring 2020. Stay tuned!

Kyung Kim (Social Sciences Librarian) & Kirsten Kinsley (Assessment Librarian)