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Keep the Romance Going with Pop Lit!

February is short but mighty; filled with celebrations, heart-filled valentines and sweets. So, let’s go all in with the love fest. Here are some romantic book recommendations from the FSU Libraries Popular Literature Collection in Strozier.

MODERN LOVE (Call Number F RAI)

Alisha Rai’s Modern Love series combines good ol’ fashioned attraction with a modern twist featuring a diverse cast of characters in this delightful trio.

The Right Swipe kicks off the series. App developer Rhiannon Hunter focuses on the success of her dating app yet in a twist of irony neglects her own love life with a cynical view. Allowing herself only the occasional hookup, her app’s latest match leads to a steamy encounter with a surprisingly handsome yet sweet hunk who seemingly ghosts her. Yet there’s more to the story than meets the app.

Girl Gone Viral continues the series and features Rhiannon’s friend and roommate who’s a former model turned investor that ends up on the wrong end of a live-tweeted #meetcute moment that’s suddenly gone viral. But it shows you can’t always believe what you see online. Not only is Katrina King mortified at her hard-fought anonymity being shattered but the innocent convo with the stranger at the coffee shop isn’t the love connection the world thinks it is. Kat’s not into #CafeBae but the bodyguard who has been by her side for years.

First Comes Like puts a new spin on the age-old mistake identity trope. Beauty influencer Jia Ahmed is more focused on expanding her brand which will bring her the cadre she needs to prove herself to her family who doesn’t understand internet success. Still when a Bollywood star slides into her DMs, Jia gets caught in a web of love and catfishing. After an embarrassing accusatory meltdown, most guys would walk away but Dev Dixit can’t get Jia out of his mind. Besides, a showmance might be what the boost they both need for their careers. But what happens with a faux relationship when things get real?

Here are some other recommendations for romantic reads that all heart:

JUST JULIET (Call Number F REA)

Charlotte Reagan’s Just Juliet is coming-of-age story about a teen whose comfortable life is about to get shaken up when a new girl moves in next door. Lena has a sweet life. Her boyfriend plays football and her best friend is a cheerleader which means high school life has been pretty plum. Juliet’s arrival brings new feelings, friends and adventures that makes Lena reevaluate her life and her future.

I <3 THE EARL (Call Number F LIN)

If you don’t have time, I Love the Earl is a perfect pick for a quick read. It’s still pretty swoonworthy despite being a novella prequel for Caroline Linden’s The Truth About the Duke series. The sister of the aforementioned duke is a plain yet witty woman, preparing to embrace spinsterhood as she grows closer to 30. Then her brother, who recently inherited the Dukedom of Durham, makes her the eligible heiress in the Ton by settling a massive dowry on her. Still, Margaret has no desire to give her heart or hand to a fortune hunter; yet penniless Rhys, Earl of Dowling finds he wants more than her fortune. He wants her love.

You can pick up these recommended romance reads in The Pop Lit Collection, which is next to the Strozier Starbucks Café on the main floor. Go to the fiction section and look for the call number (a code which helps find the book location) on the spine of the book. You can also get each book through in-library or curbside request.

Written by Shaundra Lee.
Have romance suggestions? Email lib-poplit@fsu.edu

STEM Data Fellow Spotlight: William-Elijah Clark

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For Love Data Week 2022, we are highlighting our FSU STEM Libraries Data Fellows! These posts, written by the fellows themselves, tell their stories of how they became interested in data-related work and their experience as a data fellow to this point. Today’s post is contributed by William-Elijah Clark.

It’s hard to say exactly when I first got interested in data. After all, my mother was a statistician, so I’ve always been surrounded by data since I was in elementary school — from Arkansas Department of Health public health and mortality statistics to Disney World focus groups and market research. Personally, I started liking statistics when I took UCF’s equivalent to QMB 3200 and Econometrics. This experience extended into being a research assistant at UCF, and even into conducting and monitoring surveys at Universal Orlando Resort! Through my Econometrics course and from additional professional development opportunities at Universal, I was also able gain experience with R (although I didn’t learn it to the extent that I would call myself a professional data analyst or a data scientist.)

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns in Orlando back in 2020, I decided to go back to school here at Florida State University for Statistics, especially considering that FSU has a SAS coding certificate! Overall, I came to Florida State University with over two years of professional survey experience between academia and hospitality industry work.           

I spent time in 2020 taking calculus courses and statistics electives here at FSU to hone my data analysis skills further. I then saw an opportunity to apply for a FSU Libraries data fellowship beginning in Fall 2021. I decided to apply, as this position would give me the opportunity to utilize some of the skills I obtained from my previous positions and coursework at UCF and FSU, and hopefully develop some new skills to further myself in my goals of becoming a data analyst (and hopefully even an econometrician).

So far in my fellowship here at FSU Libraries, I have had the opportunity to gain some experience with MATLAB and SQL through the Data @ Your Desk workshops at Dirac, as well as some experience writing surveys in Qualtrics (as opposed to just conducting and monitoring surveys). I’ve also had the opportunity to learn more about citation management, library research, and data management. I’ve even been able to explain concepts for MS Excel to a patron via the online “Ask a Data Librarian” feature on the FSU Libraries website. This all said, I’m looking forward to applying some of my previous R coding and statistical analysis skills to some survey data for FSU Libraries this semester.

How do the Pros do Data Analysis?

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By: Diego Bustamante and William-Elijah Clark

INTRODUCTION

As technology continues to evolve, the infrastructure needed to run this technology gets more and more sophisticated. Processes and tasks carried out by personal computers, smartphones, and appliances are increasingly automated and run with minimal input from the user. This is made possible through code that is developed with one or more computer programming languages.  However, with the increase in the quantity of software and programming applications, the demand for programmers and the number of languages they are required to learn has increased.  Furthermore, many employers now require skills in data analysis and computer programming as prerequisites for job applications.  In this blog post, we will discuss the most in demand languages in the market and give a brief explanation of each.  (Grand Canyon University 2020; Jiidee 2020; Meinke 2020; University of California – Berkeley, n.d.) 

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This Black History Month: Celebrating Black Voices in Fiction

Black history in the United States cannot be given due attention in a meager blog post. From the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, to Reconstruction, to the Civil Rights movement and the Black Lives Matter movement, it’s easy to get entrenched in stories of Black pain and trauma. But amidst that there is also: excellence, joy, and success. It’s important to remember that Black history is not a thing of the past; history is being made every day.

Although there’s a plethora of seminal nonfiction texts written on Black history and the Black diaspora in America – you can check out How To Be An Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi or A Black Women’s History of the United States by Daina Ramey Berry and Kali Nicole Gross, among others, for more critical reading – for the purposes of this post, we’ve focused on some wonderful voices in fiction*. We’ve selected a short list of classics and contemporary works from our Popular Literature collection, ranging from literary fiction to romance to science fiction. A permalink for each book is included below, which will take you to our catalog – there, you can search for more books by Black authors.

If you have suggestions for books you cannot find in our collection, please let us know by emailing lib-poplit@fsu.edu.

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Tattoo Tuesday Posts, January 2022

Scroll to peruse all Tattoo Tuesday book recommendations posted in the month of January, 2022.

With apologies to the tattoo’s owner, we cannot supply a book about dolphins – our Popular Literature catalog is evidently lacking in that department – but this week’s selection is written by someone who loves dragons as much as you love dolphins. We hope that this sense of passion for the extraordinary and inquisitiveness in the ordinary is conveyed in A Natural History of Dragons: a Memoir by Lady Trent by Marie Brennan, and that this selection piques your interest. To learn more about this title, visit it on the FSU catalog here: https://fsu-flvc.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/01FALSC_FSU/pag4dr/alma990352349780306576.

Moving into a new house: FSU Libraries updates and improves Research Repository

By Rachel Smart and Camille Thomas

In the Summer of 2021, FSU Libraries migrated DigiNole: FSU’s Digital Repository to a new home that is completely hosted and maintained by Florida State University. DigiNole: FSU’s Digital Repository  features FSU’s theses and dissertations, open access research and digitized archival collections. DigiNole is Florida State University’s unified platform for FSU-created and maintained digital resources providing access to a wide range of different materials in the Digital Library and Research Repository.

The transition between site hosts involved a complex, multi-layered process. This transition took two years to complete, beginning in the planning stages and ending at the time of public launch July 15, 2021. Users will notice better responsiveness to mobile devices, a more elegant interface, and better overall site performance. Users are also able to directly download video and audio files from records which is a functionality available in the new system.

Since the launch of the upgrade system on July 15, 2021, the Libraries’ internal Working Group began exploring new features such as a 3D object viewer and integrating ORCID as part of a new repository submission process. The internal group is also working on ADA compliant enhancements to ensure the accessibility for theses and dissertations. Additionally, audiovisual items will display closed captions streams.

FSU faculty, staff, students and postdocs are invited to submit research outputs such as articles, book chapters, reports, datasets, and posters to the Research Repository to make them publicly available at no cost to the author. Library workers are available to assist in compliance with copyright, publisher policies and the FSU Faculty Senate Open Access Policy.

The Research Repository is the platform for self-archiving published or pre-publication works for free public use. Authors provide access to preprints or post-prints (according to publisher policy) in an institutional archive such as DigiNole or a disciplinary repository such as arXiv.org. This is often referred to as “Green Open Access” and aligns with the FSU Faculty Senate Open Access Policy.

FSU students, researchers, and faculty wanting to submit their works to the Research Repository, this process is unaffected by the system changes. Users submit their works through the online submission form.

Animated image capturing a user typing in the search bar at the top of the research repository's homepage.
Figure 1. This animated image demonstrates the utilization of the search bar on the Research Repository’s homepage.
Animated image of the search results page and the user selecting a record to view.
Figure 2. This image is a continuation of the search process introduced in Figure 1., featuring the search results page and the selection of the record the user was searching for.

Our developers are leaders in contributing to the Islandora open source development community. For example, it is the first time ISLE (dockerized Islandora) has been deployed and hosted as a distributed deployment (multiple servers for different parts of the stack) in the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud environment, featuring one of the biggest Solr search engine indexes in the digital repository community. The process included building and sustaining this technical infrastructure in a cloud-based computing environment (AWS), deploying an updated version of the repository’s software stack (Islandora) within this environment, and transferring the contents of the old repository to the new one in a way that maintains their integrity and discoverability.

For more information on the system migration, visit https://www.lib.fsu.edu/diginole/diginole-migration or please contact lib-support@fsu.edu with questions.

What is ‘Big Data’ Anyway?

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By: Diego Bustamante and William-Elijah Clark

Maybe you’re on Twitter one day and search ‘#Statistics’ to look up some information for your Introductory Statistics course. Before you know it, you scroll through and see several tweets that are also marked with ‘#BigData’, and you’re left with more questions than you had when you started your search. Maybe you try to search for “big data” on Google, see the definition from Oxford, and are then left with even more questions: 

  • How large is “extremely large?”
  • What kind of patterns, trends, and interactions are we talking about?
  • What isn’t big data?

Big data as a term has become synonymous with the growth of digital data and the glut of information available to researchers and the public. Furthermore, there is a growing interest by both the public and private sector in utilizing large datasets to provide insight into market trends and to improve decision making. However, the exact definition of big data is sometimes unclear and can vary widely depending on who you ask. Businesses, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and academic researchers each view big data in a different context and with different goals for its use. (University of Wisconsin Data Science, n.d.)

a Google Trends graph that shows the number of searches for the term “Big Data” from 2007 to 2017

Above: a Google Trends graph that shows the number of searches for the term “Big Data” from 2007 to 2017

In this blog post, we aim to provide clarity and insight into the origins and definitions of big data.  We will also discuss the potential benefits and challenges surrounding big data. In doing so, we will provide some examples linking big data to applications or data that you may interact with on a daily basis.

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Popular Literature: Tattoo Tuesdays, September 2021

Scroll to peruse all Tattoo Tuesday book recommendations posted in the month of September, 2021.

Our second September pick is The Happiness Project: Or Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean my Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle and Generally Have More Fun. Phew, that’s a lot but luckily for you, you don’t have to do a lot to have fun! Gretchen Rubin takes you along for the ride of a lifetime as she chronicles her year long adventure for the quest to find happiness. Have Fun! We hope you enjoy our selection; you can find it in the Pop Lit Fiction section just outside the Starbucks area on the first floor of Strozier, or in our online catalog at https://fsu.catalog.fcla.edu/permalink.jsp?23FS025555312

You don’t have to wait until Halloween to get spooky. This week we have a tattoo inked at a Friday the 13th flash sale. In honor of that unlucky day, we’re bringing you a pop lit novel from our horror genre. Our recommendation for this week’s tattoo is Kill Creek by Scott Thomas, published in 2017. Who better to put the nail in your coffin tattoo than “master of the macabre,” main character and best-selling horror writer, Sam McGarver? Follow him and three other genre writers as they try to survive a harrowing Halloween at the Finch House, one of the most haunted houses in the country. It’s been abandoned – until now. When Sam and his genre-savvy compatriots awaken the entity that haunts it, they can either outsmart horror itself or become part of it. Kill Creek was chosen for the ALA’s Horror Book of 2017, and was shortlisted for the Bram Stoker Award. We hope you enjoy our selection; you can find it in the Pop Lit Fiction section just outside the Starbucks area on the first floor of Strozier, or in our online catalog at https://fsu.catalog.fcla.edu/permalink.jsp?23FS03597741.

Popular Literature: Tattoo Tuesdays

The Popular Literature Committee – responsible for the Popular Literature section in Strozier Library – is bringing book recommendations from our shelves to your screens every Tuesday. Although we’re marketing it as a “Tattoo Tuesday,” if you yourself are lacking in the tattoo area, you can always feel free to submit your favorite: movie, song, activity, Starbucks order, et cetera. The way it works is: You email your tattoo (or other submission) to Lib-PopLit@fsu.edu and we choose a book out of our curated Popular Literature collection we think you might enjoy based on our interpretation of your submission.

Below are our tattoo submissions and recommendations to date.

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