FSU Open Education Month 2022

Celebrate Open Education Week all month with FSU! Open Education encompasses resources, tools and practices that are free of legal, financial and technical barriers and can be fully used, shared and adapted in the digital environment (SPARC). Join us for this opportunity for sharing and learning in open education on campus and beyond. To learn more about FSU Libraries’ open education initiatives, visit our OER & Textbook Affordability Initiatives, eTextbook Information, and OER Guide.

Week 1

March 3: Open Office Hours – Faculty Informal Lunch Space (FILS) is Open Education focused throughout the month. Open space to connect, collaborate, ask questions, or bring your lunch. Dirac Library Conference Room, 11 am – 1 pm.

Week 2

March 8 – 10: OpenEd tabling on Landis and in Strozier Library : Learn more about OER and textbook affordability efforts happening on campus and how you can join the movement. Tuesday, March 8, 4 – 6 pm; Wednesday, March 9, 2 – 4 pm; & Thursday, March 10, 3 – 5 pm

March 10: Open Office Hours: Faculty Informal Lunch Space (FILS) is Open Education focused throughout the month. Open space to connect, collaborate, ask questions, or bring your lunch. Dirac Library Conference Room, 11 am – 1 pm.

March 11: OER Happy Hour: Celebrate our efforts and connect with OER colleagues. Ology at Power Mill, 5 – 7 pm

Week 3

March 17: Open Office Hours: Faculty Informal Lunch Space (FILS) is Open Education focused throughout the month. Open space to connect, collaborate, ask questions, or bring your lunch. Dirac Library Conference Room, 11 am – 1 pm.

Week 4

March 24: Open Office Hours: Faculty Informal Lunch Space (FILS) is Open Education focused throughout the month. Open space to connect, collaborate, ask questions, or bring your lunch. Dirac Library Conference Room, 11 am – 1 pm.

March 25: Equity, Inclusion, and Textbook Affordability at FSU, presented as part of Fellows Forum, Lindsey Wharton and Shawna Durtschi present on how open educational resources can provide opportunity and support diversity, inclusion, and equity efforts. (Zoom link coming soon), 11 am – 12 pm.

March 28: Open Education at FSU: Join us for a discussion on where we are with open education efforts today, from a national perspective (Sonya Bennett-Brandt, Assistant Director of Institutional Efforts at OpenStax), an OER champion on campus, and our student advocates and leaders (Graceanne Hoback, Textbook Affordability Campaign Coordinator, FSU PIRG). (Zoom link: fla.st/Q1H7OGNM ; 12 – 1 pm)

Learn more and join the open community with Open Education events happening nationwide at https://www.oeglobal.org/activities/open-education-week/

Pop Lit Tattoo Tuesday Posts, March 2022

Scroll to peruse all the Popular Literature Committee’s “Tattoo Tuesday” posts for the month of March, 2022.

Women’s History Month: Supporting Local Non-Profits

by Kaylan Williams

It’s March, which means it’s Women’s History Month! This month is all about celebrating, highlighting, and commemorating women’s contributions to society and American History. During this time, it’s important to recognize all the ways that you can contribute. Here in Tallahassee, there are a number of fantastic ways to get involved. There are countless non-profits and businesses that you can support, not just this month, but all the time! 

Junior League of Tallahassee

The Junior League of Tallahassee is a local nonprofit organization of women dedicated to improving the lives of and providing basic needs for local children and families, through “sustainable programs and strategic community partnership.” Racking in almost 14,000 hours of service over 61 total years, The Junior League of Tallahassee promotes confidence, develops leadership, and empowers young children and families.  Each Year, JLT trains new members as volunteers and leaders in our community.  But that’s not all, The JLT also has a Community Partner program, whose goal is to further their mission by funding a partnering non-profit, and assist them in launching or growing a project through JLT’s volunteer power, promotional power, and financial grant support capabilities. You can donate to JLT here, and find their website here.

Survive and Thrive Advocacy Center Inc.

Survive and Thrive Advocacy Center Inc is personally my favorite Tallahassee non-profit. As soon as you enter the website, you are welcomed with a plethora of very valuable information about sex trafficking right here in Leon County, the risks, and how to prevent it. They have tons of opportunities for training and education on how to recognize, report, and prevent human trafficking, which is so necessary. However, the feature that I admire most is that at the top of the opening website page, there’s a yellow button that says “Quick Exit” that takes you to theweatherchannel.com, in case someone seeks help on their page needs a quick way to change to screen. It’s simple things like that that could keep someone safe. It’s skills like this that make all the difference in the world. You can find more information about them here.

The Oasis Center for Women and Girls

The Oasis Center was created to be a community resource center for women and girls to come together, dream, achieve, and thrive. In 2007, the founder Kelly Otte noticed that there was no one organization focused on empowering and uniting women from all walks of life in our community. The Oasis Center was created with the vision of being a diverse environment that aims to be the central resource where women can become equipped with the tools to reach their goals, and a support system to celebrate with them as they progress on their journey. You can read more about the Oasis Center here.

Girls on the Run of the Big Bend

Girls on the Run is a nonprofit organization dedicated to “creating a world where every girl knows and activates her limitless potential and is free to boldly pursue her dreams.”  GOTR Panhandle was founded in 2013,  and by the end of spring 2021, they have served over 3,200 girls at over 50 sites in 17 seasons offering scholarships to girls at Title I schools in Leon, Bay, and Jefferson Counties!  This organization does a fantastic job at inspiring young girls to be active in fun and creative ways, while also promoting confidence, happiness, and other necessarily and valuable life skills. You can find more informations about GOTR here, on their website.

These are just a few non-profits that I personally love, but the list is never ending! There’s are so many wonderful ways to get involved in our community, not just for this month, but all the time! Happy Women’s History Month!

Celebrating Black History Month in Libraries and Government Information

by Priscilla Hunt

The Government Information unit at FSU libraries provides free public access to government information and publications for the State of Florida; United Nations; and the United States federal government publications. This includes highlighting important news and events that influence public policy at these three governmental bodies. February is nationally recognized as Black History Month.

Black History Month recognizes African Americans for their achievements and contributions to society. As FSU Libraries celebrate these individuals, the Government Information unit will like to highlight how African Americans have enhanced libraries and government entities.

Continue reading Celebrating Black History Month in Libraries and Government Information

STEM Data Fellow Spotlight: Diego Bustamante

For Love Data Week 2022, we are highlighting our FSU STEM Libraries Data Fellows! These posts, written by the fellows themselves, tell their stories of how they became interested in data-related work and their experience as a data fellow to this point. Today’s post is contributed by Diego Bustamante.

Prior to my role as a Data Fellow, my idea of what data is was defined by my previous work with quantitative data collected from laboratory experiments. For example, when I worked as a Research Assistant I recorded quantitative data for chemistry experiments, like mass, temperature, volume, etc. I then conducted statistical analysis on the data in order to draw conclusions from each experiment. I personally enjoy collecting and analyzing data, especially because it can lead to many scientific and technological advancements!

While searching for jobs in FSU’s NoleNetwork in summer 2021, one job title that immediately caught my attention was “FSU STEM Libraries Data Fellow.” The job description was unique amongst other jobs offered on campus. As a data fellow, I was offered the opportunity to develop several professional skills in data reference, co-hosting programming language workshops, writing and publishing blog posts, and many more. I felt like it was a great opportunity and a good fit with my previous experience and skills, and so I decided to apply. Thankfully, I was selected as one of the inaugural data fellows, leading to a journey of professional and personal development that has thus far surpassed my initial expectations. 

One of my first tasks in the program was meeting with different librarians at FSU Libraries. In these meetings I was able to learn about different methods and applications for data analysis in a variety of disciplines. For example, I learned that the Digital Humanities Librarian uses a text-mining software to find specific words from books published in the 1800s. She used the data drawn from the software to analyze certain traits of the story by counting the amount of times a character participates in an interaction of this type. This experience helped me realize that qualitative data sets can be used to draw similar conclusions about a study as quantitative data. 

Another concept that I have become familiar with while working as a Data Fellow is open data. We discussed this concept during a workshop where we talked about the potential benefits of making research data openly accessible to the wider research community. Initially, I was hesitant regarding the concept of open data, because I saw academic research as a “race” to find a solution to a given problem. However, further discussion of how researchers are compensated for sharing their data made me realize that it is possible to benefit from open data on a personal and global level. 

Currently, I am still learning about the many different types of data, its definitions, applications, and its importance. I am also working on developing an open source Canvas module on MATLAB where I explain the basics of the math based programming language in a student friendly manner. I look forward to sharing more about this work in the future!

Keep the Romance Going with Pop Lit!

February is short but mighty; filled with celebrations, heart-filled valentines and sweets. So, let’s go all in with the love fest. Here are some romantic book recommendations from the FSU Libraries Popular Literature Collection in Strozier.

MODERN LOVE (Call Number F RAI)

Alisha Rai’s Modern Love series combines good ol’ fashioned attraction with a modern twist featuring a diverse cast of characters in this delightful trio.

The Right Swipe kicks off the series. App developer Rhiannon Hunter focuses on the success of her dating app yet in a twist of irony neglects her own love life with a cynical view. Allowing herself only the occasional hookup, her app’s latest match leads to a steamy encounter with a surprisingly handsome yet sweet hunk who seemingly ghosts her. Yet there’s more to the story than meets the app.

Girl Gone Viral continues the series and features Rhiannon’s friend and roommate who’s a former model turned investor that ends up on the wrong end of a live-tweeted #meetcute moment that’s suddenly gone viral. But it shows you can’t always believe what you see online. Not only is Katrina King mortified at her hard-fought anonymity being shattered but the innocent convo with the stranger at the coffee shop isn’t the love connection the world thinks it is. Kat’s not into #CafeBae but the bodyguard who has been by her side for years.

First Comes Like puts a new spin on the age-old mistake identity trope. Beauty influencer Jia Ahmed is more focused on expanding her brand which will bring her the cadre she needs to prove herself to her family who doesn’t understand internet success. Still when a Bollywood star slides into her DMs, Jia gets caught in a web of love and catfishing. After an embarrassing accusatory meltdown, most guys would walk away but Dev Dixit can’t get Jia out of his mind. Besides, a showmance might be what the boost they both need for their careers. But what happens with a faux relationship when things get real?

Here are some other recommendations for romantic reads that all heart:

JUST JULIET (Call Number F REA)

Charlotte Reagan’s Just Juliet is coming-of-age story about a teen whose comfortable life is about to get shaken up when a new girl moves in next door. Lena has a sweet life. Her boyfriend plays football and her best friend is a cheerleader which means high school life has been pretty plum. Juliet’s arrival brings new feelings, friends and adventures that makes Lena reevaluate her life and her future.

I <3 THE EARL (Call Number F LIN)

If you don’t have time, I Love the Earl is a perfect pick for a quick read. It’s still pretty swoonworthy despite being a novella prequel for Caroline Linden’s The Truth About the Duke series. The sister of the aforementioned duke is a plain yet witty woman, preparing to embrace spinsterhood as she grows closer to 30. Then her brother, who recently inherited the Dukedom of Durham, makes her the eligible heiress in the Ton by settling a massive dowry on her. Still, Margaret has no desire to give her heart or hand to a fortune hunter; yet penniless Rhys, Earl of Dowling finds he wants more than her fortune. He wants her love.

You can pick up these recommended romance reads in The Pop Lit Collection, which is next to the Strozier Starbucks Café on the main floor. Go to the fiction section and look for the call number (a code which helps find the book location) on the spine of the book. You can also get each book through in-library or curbside request.

Written by Shaundra Lee.
Have romance suggestions? Email lib-poplit@fsu.edu

STEM Data Fellow Spotlight: William-Elijah Clark

For Love Data Week 2022, we are highlighting our FSU STEM Libraries Data Fellows! These posts, written by the fellows themselves, tell their stories of how they became interested in data-related work and their experience as a data fellow to this point. Today’s post is contributed by William-Elijah Clark.

It’s hard to say exactly when I first got interested in data. After all, my mother was a statistician, so I’ve always been surrounded by data since I was in elementary school — from Arkansas Department of Health public health and mortality statistics to Disney World focus groups and market research. Personally, I started liking statistics when I took UCF’s equivalent to QMB 3200 and Econometrics. This experience extended into being a research assistant at UCF, and even into conducting and monitoring surveys at Universal Orlando Resort! Through my Econometrics course and from additional professional development opportunities at Universal, I was also able gain experience with R (although I didn’t learn it to the extent that I would call myself a professional data analyst or a data scientist.)

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns in Orlando back in 2020, I decided to go back to school here at Florida State University for Statistics, especially considering that FSU has a SAS coding certificate! Overall, I came to Florida State University with over two years of professional survey experience between academia and hospitality industry work.           

I spent time in 2020 taking calculus courses and statistics electives here at FSU to hone my data analysis skills further. I then saw an opportunity to apply for a FSU Libraries data fellowship beginning in Fall 2021. I decided to apply, as this position would give me the opportunity to utilize some of the skills I obtained from my previous positions and coursework at UCF and FSU, and hopefully develop some new skills to further myself in my goals of becoming a data analyst (and hopefully even an econometrician).

So far in my fellowship here at FSU Libraries, I have had the opportunity to gain some experience with MATLAB and SQL through the Data @ Your Desk workshops at Dirac, as well as some experience writing surveys in Qualtrics (as opposed to just conducting and monitoring surveys). I’ve also had the opportunity to learn more about citation management, library research, and data management. I’ve even been able to explain concepts for MS Excel to a patron via the online “Ask a Data Librarian” feature on the FSU Libraries website. This all said, I’m looking forward to applying some of my previous R coding and statistical analysis skills to some survey data for FSU Libraries this semester.

Love Data Week: Data is for Everyone

By: Dr. Nick Ruhs

INTRODUCTION

It’s once again time for Love Data Week!  LDW is a yearly, international outreach event taking place the week of Valentine’s Day (February 14-18 this year). The week is focused on promoting good data stewardship and best practices around working with and interpreting data. LDW was started in 2015 and is currently celebrated by academic libraries and data organizations around the world. While every institution celebrates in their own way, common activities include data workshops, social media outreach, and more! 

Each year, a theme is chosen around which organizations can theme their Love Data Week activities. For 2022, the theme is “Data is for everyone.” This year, we are shining a light on the “people-side” of data, and on how different folks use and interact with data. Data often means something different to everyone, and how someone interacts with data varies based on their chosen discipline, research project, life experiences, and their own beliefs and values. There are also often inherent biases that exist in data collection, analysis, and interpretation, which can affect one’s own impression of a dataset. Despite these differences, the ability to critically evaluate data and interact with it is a universal skill that is crucial for everyone. 

Continue reading Love Data Week: Data is for Everyone

How do the Pros do Data Analysis?

By: Diego Bustamante and William-Elijah Clark

INTRODUCTION

As technology continues to evolve, the infrastructure needed to run this technology gets more and more sophisticated. Processes and tasks carried out by personal computers, smartphones, and appliances are increasingly automated and run with minimal input from the user. This is made possible through code that is developed with one or more computer programming languages.  However, with the increase in the quantity of software and programming applications, the demand for programmers and the number of languages they are required to learn has increased.  Furthermore, many employers now require skills in data analysis and computer programming as prerequisites for job applications.  In this blog post, we will discuss the most in demand languages in the market and give a brief explanation of each.  (Grand Canyon University 2020; Jiidee 2020; Meinke 2020; University of California – Berkeley, n.d.) 

Continue reading How do the Pros do Data Analysis?

Tattoo Tuesday Posts, February 2022

Scroll to peruse all Tattoo Tuesday posts posted in the month of February, 2022.