Cozy Fall Reads

As the temperature finally cools off and we experience the whisper of a new season, it’s time to find that perfect book to curl up with in a big cozy chair in a coffee shop or by a fireplace, if you have one. Cozy reads are, of course, different for everyone depending on the books they prefer, but for me they should involve a happy ending, an entertaining cast of characters, a classic who-don-it, and a cat if possible (usually in the real world, curled up on my lap).

Below is a list of cozy stories with elements of love, mystery, and magic for your long and chilly evenings ahead.


The Night Circus

Waging a fierce competition for which they have trained since childhood, circus magicians Celia and Marco unexpectedly fall in love with each other and share a fantastical romance that manifests in fateful ways.


A Familiar Tail: A Witch’s Cat Mystery

Unlucky-in-love artist Annabelle Britton decides that a visit to the seaside town of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, is the perfect way to get over her problems. But when she stumbles upon a smoky grey cat named Alastair, and follows him into a charming cottage, Annabelle finds herself in a whole spell book full of trouble. Suddenly saddled with a witch’s wand and a furry familiar, Annabelle soon meets a friendly group of women who use their spells, charms and potions to keep the people of Portsmouth safe. But they can’t prevent every wicked deed in town.


The Collector

When professional house-sitter Lila Emerson witnesses a murder/suicide from her current apartment-sitting job, life as she knows it takes a dramatic turn. Suddenly, the woman with no permanent ties finds herself almost wishing for one. Artist Ashton Archer knows his brother isn’t capable of violence–against himself or others. He recruits Lila, the only eyewitness, to help him uncover what happened.


Magpie Murders

After working with bestselling crime writer Alan Conway for years, editor Susan Ryeland is intimately familiar with his detective, Atticus Pünd, who solves mysteries in sleepy English villages. His traditional formula has proved hugely successful, so successful that Susan must continue to put up with his troubling behavior if she wants to keep her job. Conway’s latest tale involves a murder at Pye Hall, with dead bodies and a host of intriguing suspects. But the more Susan reads, the more she’s convinced that there is another story hidden in the pages of the manuscript: one of real-life jealousy, greed, ruthless ambition, and murder.


The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

THE RULES OF BLACKHEATH: Evelyn Harcastle will be murdered at 11:00p.m. There are eight days , and eight witnesses for you to inhabit. We will only let you escape once you tell us the name of the killer. Understood? Then lets begin..


The Bookseller’s Secret

Now he’d fled for a second time, to a city where he believed no one would recognize him, identity secure until confronted by Sara Olson. Maintaining cover demanded he stay away from her while at the same time getting close enough to find out how much she knew. This mission impossible caused him to leave his safe zone to obtain information crucial to keeping his secret …


Intercepted

Marlee Harper is the perfect girlfriend. She’s definitely had enough practice by dating her NFL-star boyfriend for the last ten years. But when she discovers he has been tackling other women on the sly, she vows to never date an athlete again. There’s just one problem: Gavin Pope, the new hotshot quarterback and a fling from the past, has Marlee in his sights.


Cats on the Prowl

Willow, the fluffy white Persian cat, gets more than she bargained for when she comes to live at the Nelson Police Station. Nat, the big tabby tom cat, takes her under his wing and starts teaching her the art of the police cat. Before she knows what hit her, Willow finds herself caught up in a web of intrigue, murder, and adventure that will take her to her limit and beyond. With the help of Nat and a curious collection of mysterious alley cats, Willow is on her way to discovering a depth of potential and excitement she never thought possible

This blog post was written by Dianna Bradley, Digital Library Center Metadata Specialist at FSU Libraries.

FSU Libraries Welcomes International Scholars

FSU Libraries Welcome International Scholars Video (YouTube)

November is International Education Month at FSU!

Florida State University hosts over 2,000 international students from more than 130 countries. FSU Libraries seeks to serve all of the university’s international students and faculty and make them feel welcome. FSU Libraries’ International Scholar Special Interest Group strives to provide customized services and assistance for international students. We understand their unique challenges in and contributions to succeed in American classrooms and are eager to support them in their scholarly and instructional goals.

The welcome video above highlights FSU Libraries’ services and features interviews from international students expressing how they have used the Libraries at Florida State University. Here are some of their thoughts:

“You have access to any and every material you could possibly imagine or think of for your research”

Pietro Pesce (Graduate Instructor)

” It has such a diverse community in here, and it will welcome you like your family.”

Gizem Solmaz (Graduate Assistant)

This welcome video would not have been possible without the Center for Global Engagement (CGE), who recruited the international scholars featured in the video, as well as GEOSET, which produced it. We would also like to thank the following international scholars for appearing in the video: Doreen Addo-Yobo, Amy Ni, Pietro Pesce, Thais Pedrete, Gizem Solmaz, Masahiro Fukuda, Amber Noor Mustafa, Fatma Dossa, and Samy Simon. This video is hosted by the FSU Libraries’ International Scholar Special Interest Group.

Further Resources

International students interested in research are encouraged to visit Academic Research: Guide for International Students.

Events on campus and beyond for International Education Month can be found at FSU GLOBE.

Parties interested in international scholarship can reach out to the International Scholars Special Interest Group Co-Chairs, Kyung Kim kkim4@fsu.edu or Nick Ruhs nruhs@fsu.edu.

This post was written by Lisa Play, Library Instruction Specialist at FSU Libraries.

Where Are They Now: Alumni Student Employees

Libraries are one of the top campus employers of students with a yearly average of over 70 student employees in the last five years. As one of the top employers: do we play a role in the success of students while they are employed with us, and does working in the libraries influence their career experiences after graduation? In the Fall of 2021, the Assessment Team at FSU Libraries found ourselves asking these exact questions. So, we embarked on a study to explore this with some of our former libraries’ employees from the past five years. 

After receiving IRB exempt status, we connected with six former employees of the FSU Libraries Assessment Department for this first study cohort. We wanted to know how former-student employees described their work experience at the library. What aspects of library employment did they perceive influenced their current career outcomes? What are ways we could incorporate what we learned to support current part-time employees with more meaningful campus experiences while at FSU? 

Most students in this first cohort were in STEM majors and were hired in data analyst roles.  They collected, prepared, analyzed, and reported on library data, created data visualizations, benchmarked survey results, presented papers and posters at conferences, and helped to coordinate statistical survey data for national and regional organizations.  

Benefits and drawbacks of working on campus & in the Libraries

Alumni employees found working on campus to be convenient—especially since the library was located near their classes. Participants said that they valued working on a beautiful campus, with real-life data, and enjoyed working in the pleasant atmosphere of the library.  Drawbacks or challenges included time management and shifting gears between classes and work duties, and sometimes they found themselves on campus from sun-up to sundown. Some reported cramped office space, while others wished they had gotten comparable pay with that of a corporate internship and found that working a campus job did not prepare them for the fast-paced work environment of deadlines and deliverables they now face in their current jobs. 

Highlights of their FSU experience

Participants of the study shared that they enjoyed learning how to collect, find, share and synthesize data. They found it particularly useful working and visualizing real-world data to solve problems. Often students have trouble relating the information they learn from a textbook to practical applications in the real world. This experience allowed our employees to practically apply the information they learned in a job setting. Another aspect participants cited as enjoyable was the opportunity to meet and connect with other campus partners on different projects. Being able to see how data and libraries could be integral to campus success gave a new perspective to our employees. A final highlight from this study was learning how many of our women participants have excelled in STEM fields post-graduation.  

Key experiences our participants had on campus

  • Building friendships, relationships, and mentorships with colleagues and other members of the FSU Community  
  • Engagement on campus in the LeaderShape Institute and Garnet & Gold Scholars Program 
  • Opportunities for professional development, including submitting and presenting conference proposals and papers  
  • Tutoring peers including student-athletes and at the Reading Writing Center on campus 
  • Participating in internships and experiences abroad at our international campuses 
  • Going to career fairs and speaking with recruiters about potential job opportunities  

Looking into the future & how we can improve the experiences of our part-time employees

Former student employees said that they would have liked to have collaborated more with other library departments and to have learned about other parts of the library. This is especially true for those who switched their career plans and decided to work in libraries after working here. For example, one alum shared that they wished they knew more about Digital Humanities.  They also wanted more opportunities to practice their leadership skills, such as leading meetings and giving presentations. 

Overall, this study was invaluable in helping us better understand the student employee experience and ways we could improve future students’ employment at the libraries. One pillar of the Libraries’ Strategic Plan is “Investing in People” and it’s become a top priority of the organization to continue improving the professional development opportunities for both our full-time and part-time employees. This study has opened the door for others, and we hope to do further studies with the various departments within the libraries that employ student employees. To view the PowerPoint presentation for the New England College Assessment Conference, follow this link.  

If you are a former alum employee and would like to participate in this study, please reach out to Kirsten Kinsley (kkinsley@fsu.edu).

This blog post was written by Kirsten Kinsley, Assessment Librarian at FSU Libraries.

New Entrance and Scholar Support Desk

This summer Strozier received some exciting updates to improve your study experience.  Here are the changes you can expect to find upon your return to campus this fall. 

Once you enter Strozier this fall the changes will be immediately evident. As you are greeted by the security team you will find the old rotational turnstiles are no more. In their place are glass doors that automatically open once you have swiped in with your FSUID. After you breeze through the new and improved turnstiles you will be welcomed by our scholar support team at the brand new Scholar Support desk, which is now located directly across from the turnstiles. 

The new Scholar Support desk offers support for all of your needs during your time in Strozier. Here’s everything the Scholar Support Staff can help you do.

 Book and locate study rooms: Individual Study rooms be checked at the Scholar Support Desk, first come, first serve, unlike group study rooms which can be booked online via this link.

Course Reserves: Faculty can request library-owned or personal materials to be put on Course Reserve for their classes for students to use in the library only. Students, visit this page to learn more about using Course Reserves and search for your course through the Course Reserve Search! Instructors, you can learn more about what Course Reserves are and how to make a request here.

Tech for checkout: Our Scholar Support Desk circulates lots of technology, most for 4-hour loans. This includes laptops and laptop chargers, phone chargers, graphing calculators, and more! You can find what equipment the library has available for checkout  here: or stop by the Scholar Support Desk and ask the team! 

The Tech Desk: Launching this Fall, Tech Desk staff will be able to assist with technology and program troubleshooting; printing; and loaning 3-day equipment, such as cameras, projectors, game consoles, and wireless hotspots. Stop by the tall computer station on the Scholar Support Desk to ask the Tech Desk staff any technology related questions! l

Reference Associates will also be located on the Scholar Support Desk. Reference Associates are staff who can help you with your research project or paper, including how to find the best resources available through FSU Libraries’ databases and website. 

Blog post was written by Ashanti Grace, Student Engagement Assistant Strozier Library.

Celebrating Pride Month with FSU Libraries

This Pride Month, we’d like to honor the contribution the LGBTQ+ community has made to literature and to FSU Libraries. We had the opportunity to interview Haley McGuyre, a Graduate Assistant with Special Collections, and discuss their experience working on the LGBTQ+ Oral Histories Project at FSU Libraries. The full interview can be found below.

Continue reading Celebrating Pride Month with FSU Libraries

Digital Book Display: National Pet Month

May is National Pet Month! A time to celebrate our four-legged friends and furry companions! Our digital book display this month features titles that honor pets of all kinds and the wonderful impact they have in our daily lives. With this, we are also celebrating the pets of our library staff! Be sure to check out our digital pet gallery below.

Continue reading Digital Book Display: National Pet Month

Reflections on “Tikkun Olam”

By Priscilla Hunt

First proclaimed by President George W. Bush in 2006, May is known for its commemoration of Jewish American Heritage. Since then, presidents have issued a proclamation each year commemorating the month. Read Joe Biden’s 2022 Proclamation here.

As we commemorate this month, I often reflect on my first experiences with Jewish culture and traditions through my education at Florida State University. While pursuing a minor in Religion, I was lucky enough to take a course titled “Jewish Tradition” which provided me an introduction to the history and culture of Judaism. Dr. Kavka soon became one of my favorite professors that semester and while I loved everything I learned, “Tikkun Olam” is one concept that I appreciated the most and has stuck with me through the years.

Continue reading Reflections on “Tikkun Olam”

New Pop Lit Reads

We have a ton of new arrivals just in time for you to pop in and check them out for Spring Break!

We’ve received everything for your spring break reading fancy, from Science fiction to fantasy, romance to true crime, and history to literary fiction. Swing by the Pop Lit section by Starbucks on the first floor of Strozier Library and find your next favorite read for that trip to the beach.

Don’t see something you’d hoped in our Pop Lit section?? Email us your purchase recommendations!!

lib-poplit@fsu.edu

Pop Lit Tattoo Tuesday Posts, March 2022

Scroll to peruse all the Popular Literature Committee’s “Tattoo Tuesday” posts for the month of March, 2022.

STEM Data Fellow Spotlight: Diego Bustamante

For Love Data Week 2022, we are highlighting our FSU STEM Libraries Data Fellows! These posts, written by the fellows themselves, tell their stories of how they became interested in data-related work and their experience as a data fellow to this point. Today’s post is contributed by Diego Bustamante.

Prior to my role as a Data Fellow, my idea of what data is was defined by my previous work with quantitative data collected from laboratory experiments. For example, when I worked as a Research Assistant I recorded quantitative data for chemistry experiments, like mass, temperature, volume, etc. I then conducted statistical analysis on the data in order to draw conclusions from each experiment. I personally enjoy collecting and analyzing data, especially because it can lead to many scientific and technological advancements!

While searching for jobs in FSU’s NoleNetwork in summer 2021, one job title that immediately caught my attention was “FSU STEM Libraries Data Fellow.” The job description was unique amongst other jobs offered on campus. As a data fellow, I was offered the opportunity to develop several professional skills in data reference, co-hosting programming language workshops, writing and publishing blog posts, and many more. I felt like it was a great opportunity and a good fit with my previous experience and skills, and so I decided to apply. Thankfully, I was selected as one of the inaugural data fellows, leading to a journey of professional and personal development that has thus far surpassed my initial expectations. 

One of my first tasks in the program was meeting with different librarians at FSU Libraries. In these meetings I was able to learn about different methods and applications for data analysis in a variety of disciplines. For example, I learned that the Digital Humanities Librarian uses a text-mining software to find specific words from books published in the 1800s. She used the data drawn from the software to analyze certain traits of the story by counting the amount of times a character participates in an interaction of this type. This experience helped me realize that qualitative data sets can be used to draw similar conclusions about a study as quantitative data. 

Another concept that I have become familiar with while working as a Data Fellow is open data. We discussed this concept during a workshop where we talked about the potential benefits of making research data openly accessible to the wider research community. Initially, I was hesitant regarding the concept of open data, because I saw academic research as a “race” to find a solution to a given problem. However, further discussion of how researchers are compensated for sharing their data made me realize that it is possible to benefit from open data on a personal and global level. 

Currently, I am still learning about the many different types of data, its definitions, applications, and its importance. I am also working on developing an open source Canvas module on MATLAB where I explain the basics of the math based programming language in a student friendly manner. I look forward to sharing more about this work in the future!