FSU Libraries Events

FSU First Impressions Contest

As part of the Seminole First Impressions contest, FSU Facilities encouraged students, faculty, staff, and alumni to submit their ideas for campus beautification projects.

We all absolutely love Strozier Library, but definitely think there is some room for improvements. These improvements would provide a better experience for the many students, faculty, staff, and community who visit Strozier every year to study, research, grab a coffee, or just hang out.

Check out our First Impressions video entries for the FSU Libraries Service Desk; the Strozier Lobby; and the Special Collections & Archives Research Center.



Love Data Week 2020

Celebrate Love Data Week, February 10 – 14, with FSU Libraries and librarians Dr. Jesse Klein and Dr. Nick Ruhs. Join us for a week of workshops and activities to raise awareness and share practice tips, resources, and stories to encourage good data practices.

This year, the event will focus on working with students to help them get to know the data specialists at their institution, the kinds of work they do, and the data and associated issues with which these data specialists engage.

Listen to the Meet Your Librarians podcast to learn more about your data librarians.

Follow us all week on Twitter and Facebook for updates all week! Post along with us using #lovedata20.

Check out the full event schedule:

Adopt a Dataset (tabling event)
Monday, February 10, 2:00 – 4:00 pm
Strozier Library (near circulation desk)
About: What better way to love data than to adopt a dataset? This year, you can adopt an ICPSR dataset for your very own. Meet with FSU Libraries’ Data Librarians, Jesse and Nick, to find out how and grab some awesome swag! 

Introduction to Python
Tuesday, February 11, 3:00 – 4:30 pm
Dirac Instruction Room 
About: This workshop will introduce Python and its components. By the end of this workshop, attendees will understand basic programming concepts and terminology and will be able to write Python scripts. Attendees will know how to find and use resources available for furthering their knowledge of Python and apply these skills for practical applications. Presented by the Research Computing Center (RCC).

Finding & Using Social Science Data 
Wednesday, February 12, 3:00 – 4:30 pm
Scholars Commons Instruction Room & Zoom (https://fsulib.zoom.us/my/jrklein.fsulib)
About: This workshop will help participants become familiar with key concepts and resources for data in the social sciences. We will cover resources to expand your data vocabulary and search strategies for finding and using social science data. 

Adopt a Dataset (tabling event)
Thursday, February 13, 2:00 – 4:00 pm
Dirac (near circulation desk)
About: What better way to love data than to adopt a dataset? This year, you can adopt an ICPSR dataset for your very own. Meet with FSU Libraries’ Data Librarians, Jesse and Nick, to find out how and grab some awesome swag! 

Introduction to Tableau
Friday, February 14, 1:00 – 2:30 pm
Scholars Commons Instruction Room & Zoom (https://fsulib.zoom.us/my/jrklein.fsulib)
About: Tableau is a data visualization tool used to analyze and illustrate data, emphasizing the patterns and insights behind them. This session will introduce participants to the basics of preparing, analyzing, and sharing data using Tableau Public. Prior to Workshop: Download Tableau Public (https://public.tableau.com/en-us/s/download) (Free). Note: Please bring a laptop

Immigration: An interdisciplinary symposium

The University Libraries has a rich tradition of hosting interdisciplinary symposia. In the past, faculty members and students from across the disciplines have come together at the Libraries to explore topics such as water, open education, academic publishing, coffee, ethnography, and climate science.  On Thursday, November 7, 2019, the University Libraries will continue this tradition by hosting a symposium on the topic of immigration

The event will be held in the Bradley Reading Room in Strozier Library and is sponsored by the FSU Civil Rights Institute as well as the College of Social Sciences & Public Policy. Coffee, pastries, and lunch will be provided. Everyone is welcome to attend. 

Throughout the day, different presenters will look at the topic of immigration from the perspective of their particular disciplines. The schedule has been structured to allow for numerous presentations and perspectives, as well as dialog and conversation. A primary objective of the symposium is to model critical thinking and civil discourse in a positive environment.

Terry Coonan, director of the Center for the Advancement of Human Rights, and Darby Scott, director of the FSU Immigration Law Project, will kick off the day by talking about current issues, recent policy changes, and legal battles.  They will discuss topics like diminishing protections for refugees and asylum-seekers, changes to DACA, birthright citizenship, and family separation. Suanne Sinke, Professor of History, will examine the role of family in three different groups in three different time periods of U.S. immigration. Justin Vos, also from History, will look specifically at how letters are used to encounter the first-hand perspective of immigrants, and Professor of English, Virgil Suarez, will share how his own poetry is witness and record to his family’s immigrant experience. From an anthropological perspective, Vincent Joos (Modern Languages) will discuss the brutal repression of migrants in northern France and the persistence of those migrants to rebuild their lives in the U.K. Javier Ramos, from Criminology, will then examine the link between immigration and recidivism. Ramos’ research considers the impact of legal status and nationality on the tendency to reoffend. The next two presenters, Miguel Hernandez, the co-interim director of the Center for Leadership & Social Change, and Luciana Hornung, Associate General Counsel, will both look at the impact of immigation policies on our own FSU community. Hernandez will talk about the efforts FSU has taken over the past two decades to support students that are unauthorized residents, and Hornung will discuss hot topics in employment-based immigration cases, immigrant visas, and the role of in-house counsel. Finally, Matt Hauer, a sociologist and demographer, will talk about his research on forced migration due to sea-level rise and how that migration could reshape the U.S. population distribution.  

We hope that you will be able to join us for an day of collaboration and engagement around this very important topic. A detailed schedule of the day can be found at this site: https://www.lib.fsu.edu/immigration

Data Discovery Webinar Series

Join FSU Libraries this semester for a Zoom webinar series and learn about popular datasets and databases. 

Finding and Accessing Data Using ICPSR 
Date: Monday, September 9 
Time: 3 pm 
Location: Zoom 
The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) is a data repository hosted by the University of Michigan that maintains and provides access to a vast archive of social science and interdisciplinary data for research and instruction. 

Finding and Accessing Data Using Data.Gov 
Date: Monday, September 23 
Time: 3 pm 
Location: Zoom 
Data.gov aims to improve public access to high value, machine readable datasets generated by the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. The site is a repository for federal, state, local, and tribal government information, made available to the public. 

General Social Survey 
Date: Friday, September 27 
Time: 1 pm 
Location: Zoom  
Since 1972, the General Social Survey (GSS) has been monitoring societal change and studying the growing complexity of American society using comprehensive surveys measuring attitudes and behaviors. 

Introduction to Census Data and American FactFinder 
Date: Monday, October 14 
Time: 3 pm 
 Location: Zoom
The U.S. Census Bureau’s American FactFinder is the main extraction tool for Census Bureau data and is a key resource for data users. 

Cambridge Structural Database: In Celebration of National Chemistry Week! 
Date: Thursday, October 24 
Time: 1 pm 
Location: Zoom
Established in 1965, the CSD is the world’s repository for small-molecule organic and metal-organic crystal structures. Containing over one million structures from x-ray and neutron diffraction analyses, this unique database of accurate 3D structures has become an essential resource to scientists around the world. 

Exploring Environmental Spatial Data: In Celebration of Geography Week and GIS Day! 
Date: Wednesday, November 13 
Time: 3 pm 
Location: Zoom
This webinar will provide an overview of key sources for finding spatial data pertaining to the environment and environmental science. Learn to discover and download a variety of spatial datasets from sources such as the EPA’s Environmental Dataset Gateway, the Florida Geographic Data Library, and Esri Open Data. 

Love Data Week

Join FSU Libraries for workshops and activities to raise awareness and share practice tips, resources, and stories to encourage good data practices. Participate in Love Data Week and be entered to win exciting prizes, including FSU Libraries swag and gift cards! #LoveData19

See the event schedule below.

This year’s themes are:

Data in Everyday Life http://lovedataweek.org/about/data-in-everyday-life/

Data Justice  http://lovedataweek.org/about/data-justice/

Open Data http://lovedataweek.org/about/open-data/

Adopt a Dataset!

As part of Love Data Week, we’re encouraging you to adopt a dataset!

Bring your dataset to life by learning about it and introducing it to anyone who hasn’t met it before. Use the Dataset Adoption Form to find a Dataset to research and adopt and you’ll receive a Data Adoption Certificate. Share the name and something interesting about your Dataset to this thread using #LoveData19 and #ICPSR for your chance to be entered to win prizes!

Escape the Libraries: Clue Edition

escaperoom_bannerFSU Libraries is putting on its fourth escape room program in Strozier Library during October 8-19th in study rooms 106A and 106B. The study spaces will be transformed into a Clue-themed experiential learning experience. Participants will have 20 minutes to solve a series of clues using library resources and tools to escape the room and win the game. The goal of this program is to engage students and reinforce basic research skills needed for success within their undergraduate degree.

Freshman Interest Groups (FIGs) were invited to schedule a time to bring their classes by during the program’s two week run. For those interested students not in a FIG, we will be hosting two open days where students can sign-up to participate.

Friday, October 12th from 1-5pm OR Thursday, October 18th from 5-10pm

Bring your team (2-5 people) to the “Reservation Station” at Strozier Library to sign up for a 20-minute time slot during the times listed above. The “Reservation Station” will be open starting a half hour before the first game session begins. Stop by to participate and prove your prowess as a detective.

If you have any questions or would like to book your reservation time in advance, please contact Nikki Morse at nmorse@fsu.edu.

Written by: Nikki Morse