FSU Libraries Events

Love Data Week

Join FSU Libraries for workshops and activities to raise awareness and share practice tips, resources, and stories to encourage good data practices. Participate in Love Data Week and be entered to win exciting prizes, including FSU Libraries swag and gift cards! #LoveData19

See the event schedule below.

This year’s themes are:

Data in Everyday Life http://lovedataweek.org/about/data-in-everyday-life/

Data Justice  http://lovedataweek.org/about/data-justice/

Open Data http://lovedataweek.org/about/open-data/

Adopt a Dataset!

As part of Love Data Week, we’re encouraging you to adopt a dataset!

Bring your dataset to life by learning about it and introducing it to anyone who hasn’t met it before. Use the Dataset Adoption Form to find a Dataset to research and adopt and you’ll receive a Data Adoption Certificate. Share the name and something interesting about your Dataset to this thread using #LoveData19 and #ICPSR for your chance to be entered to win prizes!

Escape the Libraries: Clue Edition

escaperoom_bannerFSU Libraries is putting on its fourth escape room program in Strozier Library during October 8-19th in study rooms 106A and 106B. The study spaces will be transformed into a Clue-themed experiential learning experience. Participants will have 20 minutes to solve a series of clues using library resources and tools to escape the room and win the game. The goal of this program is to engage students and reinforce basic research skills needed for success within their undergraduate degree.

Freshman Interest Groups (FIGs) were invited to schedule a time to bring their classes by during the program’s two week run. For those interested students not in a FIG, we will be hosting two open days where students can sign-up to participate.

Friday, October 12th from 1-5pm OR Thursday, October 18th from 5-10pm

Bring your team (2-5 people) to the “Reservation Station” at Strozier Library to sign up for a 20-minute time slot during the times listed above. The “Reservation Station” will be open starting a half hour before the first game session begins. Stop by to participate and prove your prowess as a detective.

If you have any questions or would like to book your reservation time in advance, please contact Nikki Morse at nmorse@fsu.edu.

Written by: Nikki Morse

Open Textbook Network Workshop for FSU Faculty

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The Office of the Provost is sponsoring an open textbook workshop for FSU faculty from 10:00am-12:00pm on Thursday, October 25th. The workshop will be facilitated by two Open Textbook Network trainers, Dr. Abbey Dvorak and Josh Bolick from the University of Kansas. The purpose of the workshop is to introduce faculty to open textbooks and the benefits they can bring to student learning, faculty pedagogical practice, and social justice on campus.

Participating faculty will be invited to engage with an open textbook in their discipline by writing a brief review, for which they will be eligible to receive a $200 stipend.

What: Open Textbook Network Workshop

Where: Bradley Reading Room, Strozier Library

When: Thursday, October 25th, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Interested faculty members are invited to apply by Friday, October 12th. Capacity is limited and open textbooks are not available for all subjects. Preference will be based on the availability of open textbooks in applicable subject areas.

If you have questions about this workshop or open textbooks, please contact Devin Soper, Scholarly Communications Librarian, at 850-645-2600 or dsoper@fsu.edu. You can also visit the Open & Affordable Textbook Initiative website for more information about our open education initiatives.

FSU Libraries Year of Poetry: A community event you won’t want to miss.

The Southeast Review is excited to kick off the new school year with our confessions-themed open mic fundraiser + Issue 36.2 launch, hosted by the one and only David Kirby! Join us on Tuesday, September 4th at The Bark (507 All Saints St). Doors open at 7 pm. Read your most embarrassing elementary / middle school / high school / undergrad diary entries, sing a song, read a poem, perform a dramatic monologue—the stage is all yours. After all, what’s more literary or poetic than a confession?

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We will also have a photobooth (created by Art Editor, Kelly Butler; pictures taken by Kenny Johnson), a baked goods table (organized by Poetry Editor, Jayme Ringleb), a typewriter “instant poem” station (thank you, Cocoa Williams), and a silent auction table with donations from Barbara Hamby (baskets of her famous jams), Diane Roberts (a jar of her famous Tupelo Honey), Nonfiction Editor, Laurel Lathrop (short story consultation). and gift cards and merchandise from local businesses: Township, Madison Social, Lake Tribe Brewing Company, Fifth and Thomas, Painting with a Twist, The Bookshelf, Skate World, Sangha Press, SoDOUGH, Tally Cat Cafe, Quarter Moon Imports, Garnet and Gold, Taco Bout It, Sneaux Balls, Fat Cat Cafe, and Lucilla. Many thanks to all our donors and volunteers! Proceeds will go towards The Southeast Review printing costs.

Finally, let’s celebrate the launch of Issue 36.2! The Southeast Review has an exciting year ahead, especially as we continue to publish both emerging and established writers in both print issues and our new online companion, SER TWO (“This Week Online”), a projected initiated and executed by our wonderful Assistant Editor, Zach Linge. As Editor, I’m really looking forward to showcasing this beautiful mix of voices and continue to grow our online space. Things just keep getting better and better, so come celebrate with us at The Bark on Tuesday, September 4th. We’ll have our new issue on display (and for sale) during our event!

LEARN MORE: FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE

Summer Government Information Displays

FSU Libraries is a depository library for United States Federal publications, State of Florida publications, and United Nations Publications.

Every month I coordinate with Mohamed Berray, Social Science Librarian and Coordinator for Government Information, to create a government documents & information display around a specific topic that highlights works in our collections.

Our Government Information display area is at the far end of the Scholars Commons floor before the rear stairway and elevators.

This summer, we had three monthly displays.

  • Memorial Day Display: From May until early June we celebrated the United States’Memorial Day Government Information & Document Display May 2018 Display observance of Memorial Day. Celebrated on the last Monday in May, Memorial Day is celebrated to remember those who died while serving in the military. The display features a poster depicting members of the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots (WASP). Thirty eight women in WASP have died while serving during World War II. The items on display are a mix of related federal documents, items from the general collection, and an item from our juvenile collection on Memorial Day.

 

  • National Parks Display: June and July’s display honored the National Parks including the Fourth of July celebrations on the Washington mall. Millions of people visit the national parksNational Parks Government Information & Document Display May 2018 Display every year and many go during the summer. The U.S. National Park Service commissioned Hawaii Volcano poster is a reissue of Charley Harper’s original artwork. The display included federal documents and items from the general collection. There were also some e-cards with featured e-resources viaQR codes including a link to the national parks’ celebrations for the Fourth of July.

 

  • Women’s Suffrage Display: Our current display celebrates the Women's Suffrage Government Information & Document Display May 2018 Displaywomen’s suffrage movement in honor of the Voting Rights Act’s anniversary on August 18. This poster was designed to celebrate women’s history, includes images of historic women in the letters, and has been seen on related displays. The items on display are a mix of Federal documents, UN documents, reference items, and materials from the general collection that celebrate women’s suffrage movements around the world. E-cards have QR codes for electronic resources related to the topic that you can access on or off campus.

 

Earlier this year, FSU Libraries was recognized as a top 20 depository nationwide for our outreach and display of US Federal collections. Our collections serve FSU students, faculty, and staff, and members of the Tallahassee community.

WRITTEN BY: Nicole Gaudier Alemañy

The Pride Student Union Records, 1964-2015

By: Hannah Wiatt Davis

We are excited to announce our most recently processed collection, the Pride Student Union Records, 1964-2015. Now a major fixture in the Student Government Association, the collection documents Pride’s predecessor organizations and their steps towards becoming an official agency, introducing non-discrimination policies on campus, and empowering FSU’s LGBTQ+ population.

In 1969, gay and lesbians in Tallahassee organized the People’s Coalition for Gay Rights, which later became the Alliance for Gay Awareness, as a response to the Stonewall Riots. The group was primarily a political organization active in the gay rights movement of the 1970s. In 1973, staff of the University Mental Health Center (now the Student Counseling Center) formed Gay Peer Counseling to provide support and counseling for gays and lesbian students. It became the most active LGBTQ+ group on campus in the early 1970s. In 1978, the group evolved into the Gay Peer Volunteers (GPV), which provided students opportunities for services in the community outside of the counseling environment. To include all students directly served by this student organization, the Gay Peer Volunteers changed its name to the Gay/Lesbian Student Union (GLSU) in 1989, Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual Student Union (LGBSU) in 1994, Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender Student Union (LGBTSU) in 1998, and finally Pride Student Union in 2005.

dragwarsThere are several other auxiliary groups at FSU that have served the LGBTQ+ population. In 1984, Gay/Lesbian Support Services formed to continue and expand upon the goals and services of the preceding organizations.  In the 1990s, a specialist in student counseling continued the mission of GPV by founding Gay and Lesbian Allies (GALA), which was later absorbed by Tallahassee LGBTQ+ community center, Family Tree. Safe Zone-Tallahassee was founded in 1997 as a response to FSU administration to fund an LGBTQ+ committee or office space. In 2012, Safe Zone was revamped into Seminole Allies & Safe Zones, and provides workshops to students, faculty, and staff.

The collection contains administrative records, promotional materials, artwork and banners, newspapers, and journal and magazine clippings produced and collected by the organization since the late 1960s. Spanning from meeting minutes to posters for drag shows, protest banners and queer literature, the Pride Student Union Records provide a varied look at the voices of the LGBTQ+ community in Tallahassee.

To see more photographs, ephemera, and artifacts related to the history of Florida State, check out the FSU Heritage Protocol Digital Collections or like the Heritage Protocol Facebook page.

2018 FSU Great Give

1.pngFSU’s Great Give is a 36-hour online giving campaign in support of academic programs, scholarships and student activities at Florida State University. Florida State supporters can make gifts from 9 a.m. on Thursday, March 22 until the campaign ends at 9 p.m. on Friday, March 23.

This year the FSU Libraries will be focused on two very important funds.

1.  Support the Heritage Fund: Your gift to the Heritage Museum will be used to take care of the Museum, open it more often with longer hours, enhance and update its exhibits, upgrade the space including improving lighting, and creating ways to safely display valuable objects. Learn More: http://fla.st/2prGvTS

2.  Textbooks for C.A.R.E. Students: The Text Book Fund will purchase text books to be borrowed by students throughout the semester at no cost to them.  Students who are already receiving financial aid or are on scholarship may still be eligible for this fund. Learn More: http://fla.st/2FNXrPf

To learn more about our funds and how you can help, please visit the links above. Remember, giving starts at 9 a.m. on Thursday, March 22!

Open Access Week 2017

There is a serious, systemic problem in scholarly publishing that disadvantages academic authors, their institutions, the global research community, and the general public. The problem stems from the subscription-based model of scholarly publishing, whereby publishers place academic journal articles behind paywalls so that anyone who can’t pay can’t read them.

Open Access (OA) is a movement based on the principle that this situation is fundamentally unethical, and that the fruits of academic endeavor should be freely available to everyone. OA archiving and publishing are the two main strategies for accomplishing this goal, and they promise to benefit both the global research community and individual authors, moving published research into the open and thereby broadening its readership and generating more citations. OA is also fast becoming a requirement for recipients of research funding, as many public and private funding agencies have enacted public access policies to make the results of funded research accessible to all.

Open Access Week, Oct. 23-29, is an opportunity for the global research community to learn more about this important movement and the many ongoing efforts to make it the new norm in research and scholarship. To celebrate the occasion, FSU Libraries is hosting a number of workshops related to openness in research and education, and we hope you’ll join us to learn more about OA and how it can benefit you as a student, teacher, or researcher:

Open Educational Resources (OER) are free to access, reuse, revise, remix, and redistribute. This workshop will cover the benefits of using OER, resources for finding and evaluating OER, and considerations for sharing OER-based courseware and assignments with the world. This workshop will also provide a brief introduction to Creative Commons (CC) licenses and their role in the creation of Open Educational Resources (OER).

Interested in Open Access (OA) publishing, but concerned about the growing problem of “predatory” publishers? What are the benefits of OA publishing, and what tools and strategies can you use to evaluate the quality of OA journals? What about options for funding (or obtaining waivers) to cover OA article processing charges? This workshop will provide answers to these questions and more.

Wondering how to find the best conferences and publication venues in your discipline? What about building your scholarly profile and communicating the impact of your research in ways that will resonate with a broader audience? And, once you’ve got your work out there, what can you do to assess and quantify the impact of your research? This workshop will cover a range of tools and strategies that early-career researchers can use to accomplish these objectives and more.

In addition, we’d also like to take this opportunity to highlight some important ways that the Libraries support the FSU community in taking action to advance openness in research and education:

So, what can you do to advance the cause of OA through your own research and teaching?

For more information, see our research guides on Open Access Publishing and the Open Textbook Movement , or contact Devin Soper, Scholarly Communications Librarian at FSU Libraries’ Office of Digital Research & Scholarship. And don’t forget to follow the conversation on Twitter! #OAweekFSU

Open Education Week 2017

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Open Education Week, March 27-31, is an opportunity to celebrate and raise awareness about the abundance of free and open educational resources (OER) available to teachers and learners around the world. OER are written by experts and often peer-reviewed, just like their commercial equivalents, but they are published under open copyright licenses so that they can be downloaded, distributed, and adapted for free. Many excellent examples of OER are available through online portals such as OpenStax College, the Open Textbook Library, OER Commons, BCcampus, and MERLOT.

To celebrate the growth of OER and the exciting opportunities they present, educational institutions from all over the world are coming together during Open Education Week to showcase what they are doing to make education more open, free, and available to everyone.

To mark the occasion at FSU, University Libraries and the Student Government Association are partnering to bring the #textbookbroke campaign to FSU. #Textbookbroke is a national campaign aimed at informing students about open textbooks, OER, and other low-cost alternatives to traditional textbooks. It is also aimed at empowering students to provide feedback on their course materials and encourage their instructors to explore more affordable alternatives. Stop by our event tables at Strozier Library on March 28th and Dirac Library on March 29th to share how much you spent on textbooks this term and learn about textbook affordability initiatives at FSU!

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In addition, FSU Libraries will also announce the successful applicants for its Alternative Textbook Grants program, which was launched in late 2016 to support FSU instructors who are interested in adopting or remixing open textbooks and educational resources to replace commercial course materials. Based on the applications we have received thus far, participating instructors could save FSU students up to $100,000 by the spring of 2018!

For more information about the open education movement and related initiatives at FSU, see our research guide on OER, or contact Devin Soper, Scholarly Communications Librarian at FSU Libraries’ Office of Digital Research & Scholarship. And don’t forget to follow the conversation on Twitter! #textbookbrokeFSU